Arts grant helps young circus performers soar

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A showcase of trampolining, trapeze and tumbling lit up Nightcliff Community Centre as Corrugated Iron Youth Arts held their end of term circus spectacular last week.

A showcase of trampolining, trapeze and tumbling lit up Nightcliff Community Centre as Corrugated Iron Youth Arts held their end of term circus spectacular last week.

The eight-week circus workshops run in line with the school term and are supported through funding from the Northern Territory Government’s Arts and Cultural Grants Program.

Natalie Barber said being able to show off what she had learned in front of her family had been a highlight.

“I’ve just learned so much and had such a great time,” she said.

“Now I can nail my handstands and cartwheels, I’m really looking forward to learning how to do flips next.”

For trainer Sammy George, the circus workshops have been a huge part of his life having started the program himself as a seven-year-old.

“I started as a youngster and immediately loved it that I’ve risen through the ranks and I’ve now been a trainer for the past three years,” he said.

“The best thing is just to see how far the kids develop over the program in their confidence, communication and making a bunch of new friends.

“Most importantly it is just so great to see them having so much fun.”

Corrugated Iron Youth Arts executive producer Zoe Scrogings said the program also provided a vital employment outlet for teaching artists.

“This program not only provides a wonderful opportunity for young people but also supports about 70 professional artists who we contract throughout the year,” she said.

“Most years we have about 3000 children and young people participate in our workshops and this week we’ll have about 300 families through to watch the end of term showcases.”

A/Director of Arts NT Georgia Thomas said in the latest Arts and Cultural Grants Program funding round Corrugated Iron Youth Arts had been awarded $25,000.

This funding will be used to work with circus and creative industry expert Mike Finch, former artistic director of Circus Oz, to develop a succession planning framework to increase the development and training opportunities for emerging, early career circus artists and trainers.

“This initiative will support Corrugated Iron Youth Arts to develop and provide innovative opportunities for circus trainers and pathways for young circus and aerial artists to achieve success in circus as a career,” Georgia said.

“This will build capacity in the organisation to support circus opportunities for the next generation of emerging and early career artists and trainers in the NT”.

More information about the circus workshops can be found on Corrugated Iron Youth Arts website

Performance

Evangeline Robinson, Natalie Barber, Mabel Miller, Zoe Janssen and Lilly Hodson celebrate after completing their ‘floor is lava’ circus showcase.

Corrugated Iron Youth Arts

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